Wild About Freo

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Birds, plants, flowers, person - wild about freo.


Record and share your observations around Freo / Walyalup.


Whether you’re an expert, nature lover or you’ve just had more time recently to stop and smell the flowers, we want you to help observe and record what’s wild about Freo! We want to know what you find in your backyard or even when out exercising locally.

We have a variety of environments, from marine on our western border through to tall tuart, jarrah and marri trees at our eastern border in Sir Frederick Samson Park, one of our two bush forever sites. We even have an international flyway overhead!

Many of our plants and animals are found nowhere else. We’re located within the wider south-west WA global biodiversity hotspot, which means the area has over 1,500 vascular plants found nowhere else on earth (endemic) but has also lost over 70% of its primary native vegetation.


Get started:

1. Head to our dedicated Wild About Freo project page on the iNaturalist platform where you can log in or sign up to record your finds. You can also seek advice from the community and aim to move up the leader board!


2. Don't forget to pop back here to tell us what you've been up to on our story board below.


3. Stay tuned for more news and tips on supporting local biodiversity.


Have fun but please ensure you follow the current health advice in relation to COVID19. For the latest information, visit the WA Department of Health website.


Record and share your observations around Freo / Walyalup.


Whether you’re an expert, nature lover or you’ve just had more time recently to stop and smell the flowers, we want you to help observe and record what’s wild about Freo! We want to know what you find in your backyard or even when out exercising locally.

We have a variety of environments, from marine on our western border through to tall tuart, jarrah and marri trees at our eastern border in Sir Frederick Samson Park, one of our two bush forever sites. We even have an international flyway overhead!

Many of our plants and animals are found nowhere else. We’re located within the wider south-west WA global biodiversity hotspot, which means the area has over 1,500 vascular plants found nowhere else on earth (endemic) but has also lost over 70% of its primary native vegetation.


Get started:

1. Head to our dedicated Wild About Freo project page on the iNaturalist platform where you can log in or sign up to record your finds. You can also seek advice from the community and aim to move up the leader board!


2. Don't forget to pop back here to tell us what you've been up to on our story board below.


3. Stay tuned for more news and tips on supporting local biodiversity.


Have fun but please ensure you follow the current health advice in relation to COVID19. For the latest information, visit the WA Department of Health website.

  • Who's flying in Freo?

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    7 days ago

    Look to the skies - Our Natural Areas Maintenance Officer has put together a fantastic list of birds you can spot in Freo and surrounds, whether you're a beginner or a seasoned birder.

    To download the guide, click here or visit the document library.

    Thanks to user thebboys for this photo of some Little Corellas - head over to iNaturalist to see more observations and report your own!

    Look to the skies - Our Natural Areas Maintenance Officer has put together a fantastic list of birds you can spot in Freo and surrounds, whether you're a beginner or a seasoned birder.

    To download the guide, click here or visit the document library.

    Thanks to user thebboys for this photo of some Little Corellas - head over to iNaturalist to see more observations and report your own!

  • Endangered Species Day - celebrating Banksia Woodlands

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    17 days ago

    It's Endangered Species Day and we're shining a spotlight on a local threatened ecological community - the Banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain.

    What is a Banksia Woodland and why is it important?

    The Banksia Woodland community is unique type of woodland found only in the south west of WA, including around Perth. To identify Banksia Woodland you can start by looking for a prominent layer of Banksia plants and a diverse understorey with many wildflowers.

    Banksia Woodlands are an important habitat for over 20 other nationally threatened species such as Carnaby’s and forest red-tailed black cockatoos, chuditch (western quoll) and western ringtail possum; as well as many wildflowers unique to the south-west and other animals that depend on them, like the honey possum.

    The Woodlands provide ecosystem services like helping cool temperatures in the area, storing carbon, filtering and maintaining Perth's groundwater, helping reduce flooding, soil loss and pollution, and of course they are a beautiful place for people to bushwalk and enjoy nature.

    Why is this ecological community threatened?

    This community was once common around Perth on the Swan Coastal Plain but has been reduced by about 60%.

    Large amounts of this unique Banksia Woodland have been cleared and the remaining areas are very fragmented. This stops the migration of pollinators between the communities and leaves them vulnerable.

    They also face other threats such as dieback diseases, invasive species, changes to fire regimes, changes to groundwater levels, climate change and other disturbances.

    Find out more about our Banksia Woodlands and where to spot some by clicking here.

    It's Endangered Species Day and we're shining a spotlight on a local threatened ecological community - the Banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain.

    What is a Banksia Woodland and why is it important?

    The Banksia Woodland community is unique type of woodland found only in the south west of WA, including around Perth. To identify Banksia Woodland you can start by looking for a prominent layer of Banksia plants and a diverse understorey with many wildflowers.

    Banksia Woodlands are an important habitat for over 20 other nationally threatened species such as Carnaby’s and forest red-tailed black cockatoos, chuditch (western quoll) and western ringtail possum; as well as many wildflowers unique to the south-west and other animals that depend on them, like the honey possum.

    The Woodlands provide ecosystem services like helping cool temperatures in the area, storing carbon, filtering and maintaining Perth's groundwater, helping reduce flooding, soil loss and pollution, and of course they are a beautiful place for people to bushwalk and enjoy nature.

    Why is this ecological community threatened?

    This community was once common around Perth on the Swan Coastal Plain but has been reduced by about 60%.

    Large amounts of this unique Banksia Woodland have been cleared and the remaining areas are very fragmented. This stops the migration of pollinators between the communities and leaves them vulnerable.

    They also face other threats such as dieback diseases, invasive species, changes to fire regimes, changes to groundwater levels, climate change and other disturbances.

    Find out more about our Banksia Woodlands and where to spot some by clicking here.

  • Green your garden

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    about 1 month ago

    Throughout May 2020 the City and APACE Nursery are offering all City of Fremantle residents native plants for your private property at the subsidised price of $35 per pack.

    Each pre-selected pack contains 20 various species best suited to Fremantle conditions. Residents can purchase up to two packs per household (giving you a whopping 40 new individual plants for your property!). You can check what's in each pack on the APACE Nursery website.

    Be quick as plants are limited. Due to the COVID-19 crisis, the collection of packs will be different this year. To find how to get your pack read the full story by clicking here or visit: www.fremantle.wa.gov.au/news-and-media/green-your-garden-subsidised-plants

    Throughout May 2020 the City and APACE Nursery are offering all City of Fremantle residents native plants for your private property at the subsidised price of $35 per pack.

    Each pre-selected pack contains 20 various species best suited to Fremantle conditions. Residents can purchase up to two packs per household (giving you a whopping 40 new individual plants for your property!). You can check what's in each pack on the APACE Nursery website.

    Be quick as plants are limited. Due to the COVID-19 crisis, the collection of packs will be different this year. To find how to get your pack read the full story by clicking here or visit: www.fremantle.wa.gov.au/news-and-media/green-your-garden-subsidised-plants