Our Coastal Future - Port Beach

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Sand nourishment via dredge project to address coastal erosion at Port Beach.

After extensive community engagement and collaboration with Fremantle Ports and other State government agencies, work will soon begin at Port Beach to address coastal erosion.

In March 2019, we asked for community input to help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address coastal erosion in the Port Beach locality. In 2019, a coastal adaptations report prepared for Port Beach compared five options to protect Port Beach. After detailed analysis sand nourishment via dredge was the highest ranked option.

In 2020, the State government announced a $3.25m WA Recovery Plan grant to implement a sand nourishment via dredge project at Port Beach and subsequent detailed technical investigations and design have recently been completed.

The project working team between City, Fremantle Ports and Department of Transport is currently completing investigations and modelling required to progress the approvals process to implement the sand nourishment via dredge project.

The project will be delivered in two phases:

  • Phase 1 - to prepare Port Beach for the sand nourishment via dredge program, the City will shortly undertake screening of sand within Sandtrax Beach and the southern 200m of Port Beach, south of Tydeman Road, to remove small rocks and excavate and remove large rock from remnant from the defunct seawall.
  • Phase 2 - to supply suitable sand for beach nourishment at Port Beach, 150,000m3 of sand will be dredged from the Fremantle Ports Deep Water Channel and placed onto Port Beach. The works will involve marine based machinery transporting the dredged sand from the Fremantle Ports Deep Water Channel, with land-based equipment working on the beach to manage receival of the sand and construction of the beach profile. It is anticipated this program of works will commence at the end of summer 2022.


Phase 1 - site works scheduled to commence October 2021

The City has recently engaged a contractor to undertake the sand screening and removal of the remnant seawall. After the preparation of the necessary management plans, works are anticipated to commence at the end of August 2021, taking approximately 4 weeks to complete.

This is a complex project and the City will be working with the contractor and broader project team to minimise impacts on all stakeholders and visitors to Port Beach throughout the project.

For more background information on coastal erosion at Port Beach or for more details on the sand nourishment via dredge project, please refer to our FAQs.

To receive regular project updates, we encourage you to join our mailing list.


An evolving coastline...

This area has undergone substantial changes since the late 1800s with significant impacts from urban development altering the coastline. Port Beach is essentially an artificial beach that was shaped by the early construction work associated with the Fremantle Harbour and Fremantle Port.

The area has continued evolving over the decades, including the more recent Rous Head extension and realignment of Port Beach Road. Various historical uses and developments have resulted in hard infrastructure surrounding Port Beach.

Port Beach is one of Fremantle’s popular beaches, accessed by locals and visitors year round. To browse the history of Port Beach and how it has changed over time, browse the slideshow below.

Historical data confirms that coastal processes such as wind, currents and waves, as well as sea level rise, have contributed to erosion at Port Beach over the last 23 years. The most recent event in 2018 caused significant damage with the receding shoreline compromising the Port Beach car park.

All coastal local governments are required by state planning policy to identify potential coastal hazards and plan for risk management and adaptation. The City of Fremantle coastal hazard assessment carried out in 2016 and 2017 identified the Port Beach area, including Sandtrax Beach, is highly vulnerable to immediate and future coastal erosion. You can find out more in the Port, Leighton and Mosman Beaches Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Plan (CHRMAP).



Sand nourishment via dredge project to address coastal erosion at Port Beach.

After extensive community engagement and collaboration with Fremantle Ports and other State government agencies, work will soon begin at Port Beach to address coastal erosion.

In March 2019, we asked for community input to help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address coastal erosion in the Port Beach locality. In 2019, a coastal adaptations report prepared for Port Beach compared five options to protect Port Beach. After detailed analysis sand nourishment via dredge was the highest ranked option.

In 2020, the State government announced a $3.25m WA Recovery Plan grant to implement a sand nourishment via dredge project at Port Beach and subsequent detailed technical investigations and design have recently been completed.

The project working team between City, Fremantle Ports and Department of Transport is currently completing investigations and modelling required to progress the approvals process to implement the sand nourishment via dredge project.

The project will be delivered in two phases:

  • Phase 1 - to prepare Port Beach for the sand nourishment via dredge program, the City will shortly undertake screening of sand within Sandtrax Beach and the southern 200m of Port Beach, south of Tydeman Road, to remove small rocks and excavate and remove large rock from remnant from the defunct seawall.
  • Phase 2 - to supply suitable sand for beach nourishment at Port Beach, 150,000m3 of sand will be dredged from the Fremantle Ports Deep Water Channel and placed onto Port Beach. The works will involve marine based machinery transporting the dredged sand from the Fremantle Ports Deep Water Channel, with land-based equipment working on the beach to manage receival of the sand and construction of the beach profile. It is anticipated this program of works will commence at the end of summer 2022.


Phase 1 - site works scheduled to commence October 2021

The City has recently engaged a contractor to undertake the sand screening and removal of the remnant seawall. After the preparation of the necessary management plans, works are anticipated to commence at the end of August 2021, taking approximately 4 weeks to complete.

This is a complex project and the City will be working with the contractor and broader project team to minimise impacts on all stakeholders and visitors to Port Beach throughout the project.

For more background information on coastal erosion at Port Beach or for more details on the sand nourishment via dredge project, please refer to our FAQs.

To receive regular project updates, we encourage you to join our mailing list.


An evolving coastline...

This area has undergone substantial changes since the late 1800s with significant impacts from urban development altering the coastline. Port Beach is essentially an artificial beach that was shaped by the early construction work associated with the Fremantle Harbour and Fremantle Port.

The area has continued evolving over the decades, including the more recent Rous Head extension and realignment of Port Beach Road. Various historical uses and developments have resulted in hard infrastructure surrounding Port Beach.

Port Beach is one of Fremantle’s popular beaches, accessed by locals and visitors year round. To browse the history of Port Beach and how it has changed over time, browse the slideshow below.

Historical data confirms that coastal processes such as wind, currents and waves, as well as sea level rise, have contributed to erosion at Port Beach over the last 23 years. The most recent event in 2018 caused significant damage with the receding shoreline compromising the Port Beach car park.

All coastal local governments are required by state planning policy to identify potential coastal hazards and plan for risk management and adaptation. The City of Fremantle coastal hazard assessment carried out in 2016 and 2017 identified the Port Beach area, including Sandtrax Beach, is highly vulnerable to immediate and future coastal erosion. You can find out more in the Port, Leighton and Mosman Beaches Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Plan (CHRMAP).



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    For the Port Beach, sand nourishment via dredging project, what company are you hiring workers from? Also, are they shift workers? If not, have you considered the guidelines on the overtime and work hours shown on here: https://www.abcc.gov.au/your-rights-and-responsibilities/wages-and-entitlements/pay/overtime-and-hours-work

    Nat asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The successful Contractor for the sand nourishment and dredging works will be appointed through an appropriate procurement process subject to the requirements of the Project Working Team organisations. The Contractor will be required to comply with all relevant legal requirements and labour laws.

Page last updated: 30 September 2021, 10:43