Our Coastal Future - Port Beach

We're investigating options to manage coastal erosion at Port Beach. We're seeking your input on how you use Port Beach and the values you place on its facilities and amenity.

We're working with Fremantle Ports on this project, supported by the Department of Transport’s Coastal Adaptation and Protection (CAP) grant program.

A project reference group has been established with representatives from local and state government agencies and community groups.

We're seeking your input to help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address costal erosion in the Port Beach locality for the long term. Please tell us more in the survey at the bottom of this page.


An evolving coastline...

This area has undergone substantial changes since the late 1800s with significant impacts from urban development altering the coastline. Port Beach is essentially an artificial beach that was shaped by the early construction work associated with the Fremantle Harbour and Fremantle Port.

The area has continued evolving over the decades, including the more recent Rous Head extension and realignment of Port Beach Road. Various historical uses and developments have resulted in hard infrastructure surrounding Port Beach.

Port Beach is one of Fremantle’s popular beaches, accessed by locals and visitors year round. To browse the history of Port Beach and how it has changed over time, browse the slideshow below.

Historical data confirms that coastal processes such as wind, currents and waves, as well as sea level rise, have contributed to erosion at Port Beach over the last 23 years. The most recent event in 2018 caused significant damage with the receding shoreline compromising the Port Beach car park.

All coastal local governments are required by state planning policy to identify potential coastal hazards and plan for risk management and adaptation. The City of Fremantle coastal hazard assessment carried out in 2016 and 2017 identified the Port Beach area, including Sandtrax Beach, is highly vulnerable to immediate and future coastal erosion. You can find out more in the Port, Leighton and Mosman Beaches Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Plan (CHRMAP).


Tell us how you currently use Port Beach and the values you place on the surrounding facilities and amenity.

Your feedback will help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address coastal erosion in the Port Beach locality for the long term.

For further information on the project please check our frequently asked questions. If you can't find what you're looking for, feel free to drop us a line using the Q&A tool below.

Please share your thoughts with us in the survey below by Sunday 24 March 2019.



We're investigating options to manage coastal erosion at Port Beach. We're seeking your input on how you use Port Beach and the values you place on its facilities and amenity.

We're working with Fremantle Ports on this project, supported by the Department of Transport’s Coastal Adaptation and Protection (CAP) grant program.

A project reference group has been established with representatives from local and state government agencies and community groups.

We're seeking your input to help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address costal erosion in the Port Beach locality for the long term. Please tell us more in the survey at the bottom of this page.


An evolving coastline...

This area has undergone substantial changes since the late 1800s with significant impacts from urban development altering the coastline. Port Beach is essentially an artificial beach that was shaped by the early construction work associated with the Fremantle Harbour and Fremantle Port.

The area has continued evolving over the decades, including the more recent Rous Head extension and realignment of Port Beach Road. Various historical uses and developments have resulted in hard infrastructure surrounding Port Beach.

Port Beach is one of Fremantle’s popular beaches, accessed by locals and visitors year round. To browse the history of Port Beach and how it has changed over time, browse the slideshow below.

Historical data confirms that coastal processes such as wind, currents and waves, as well as sea level rise, have contributed to erosion at Port Beach over the last 23 years. The most recent event in 2018 caused significant damage with the receding shoreline compromising the Port Beach car park.

All coastal local governments are required by state planning policy to identify potential coastal hazards and plan for risk management and adaptation. The City of Fremantle coastal hazard assessment carried out in 2016 and 2017 identified the Port Beach area, including Sandtrax Beach, is highly vulnerable to immediate and future coastal erosion. You can find out more in the Port, Leighton and Mosman Beaches Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Plan (CHRMAP).


Tell us how you currently use Port Beach and the values you place on the surrounding facilities and amenity.

Your feedback will help shape the assessment of coastal management options and inform a concept plan to address coastal erosion in the Port Beach locality for the long term.

For further information on the project please check our frequently asked questions. If you can't find what you're looking for, feel free to drop us a line using the Q&A tool below.

Please share your thoughts with us in the survey below by Sunday 24 March 2019.



Port Beach Community Values

We're seeking your input - how do you use Port Beach and what values do you place on the surrounding facilities and amenity? Your feedback will help shape the assessment of coastal management options. Please complete the survey below by Sunday 24 March 2019. The survey is in two pages, save and continue to complete page two.


If you require assistance please email us at communityengagement@fremantle.wa.gov.au or phone 9432 9999. Alternative formats are also available on request.   If you require the survey to be translated from English, contact the Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) National to complete the survey over the phone on 131 450. Please advise TIS that the number to connect to is (08) 9432 9999.

CLOSED: This survey has concluded.