Griffiths Park Upgrade

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Consultation has concluded

We're planning an upgrade of Griffiths Park to make sure it meets the needs of all users. It will include a play space renewal, conversion of the sump to an open swale integrated into the park and irrigation / hydrozoning.

The project is grant funded which means it needs to be delivered within a set timeframe. We aimed to get as much community input as possible early in the process so it can incorporated it into a concept design.


What we heard

Through other recent engagements we've gathered some input about what you value about Griffiths Park and how it could better suit your needs. In stage one engagement we heard from 50 participants online, 60 people attended the drop-in and we worked with 19 local students.

  • Broad support for converting the sump to an integrated swale with a focus on simple seating and a quiet space to connect with nature.
  • Key values are the trees, open space, birds, bird habitat, dog exercise, play equipment and the circular path. Biodiversity / habitat and swale could be a point of difference between this park and others in Hilton.
  • Climbing and nature play were ranked in the top three preferred activities across all methods. Swinging or being in a cubby were also popular.
  • The most frequently mentioned play element was a flying fox, followed by slides, swings, monkey bars and climbing frames, with the need to include more challenging / bigger pieces catering to older children while maintaining function for young children.
  • Separating users was raised several times with differing views on how and why. The key conflict identified was dogs and children, with some suggesting fencing around the playground or part of playground. Others do not want fencing or prefer use of landscaping or ideas such as separating the dog and human water fountains. Many children also noted they visit the park with their dog.

You can access the stage one engagement report here or from the document library.

You can explore each aspect of the upgrade in the interactive image above - click to view proposed options and information and click the icon on the bottom right hand corner to enlarge the image.

The Draft Concept Design including a full view of the park is also available to view as a PDF by clicking here or from the document library.


Key moves

In response to what we heard we’ve developed a draft concept. The key moves are:

  • Convert the sump to a multi-use swale with a natural approach to stormwater management. It will also contribute to biodiversity / habitat and usable community space by incorporating local plant species, adding walk trails, seating and wild play.
  • Retain and foster existing mature trees for shade, habitat and sense of place, and integrated into the design of the park as part of the upgrade. Where mature trees appear in poor health which can be treated, the City will take steps to remediate the trees. Some trees may need to be removed due to a range of issues including their decline from age or unrecoverable health issues.
  • The swale, play area and kickabout area have been expanded and we anticipate some younger trees which are poorly placed and are exhibiting health issues like being rootbound, may need to be removed. The City will ensure additional tree planting, in appropriate locations will be included in the proposed design.
  • Upgrade the irrigation and build on the ecological theme from engagement by removing turf from selected areas to conserve water and increase biodiversity.
  • In response to the preference for climbing and nature play, the concept design includes a climbing fort with slide, net and cubby, swings, and the popularly requested flying fox. Also, the playground and multi-use swale incorporates boulders and logs to create nature play opportunities and enhance the ecological themes.
  • We understand that the park needs to cater to various users. Various turf ‘rooms’ are for passive and active recreation activities from picnics to a kickabout area with footy practice goals.
  • Also highlighted was the separation of the playspace from informal dog exercise areas as well as surrounding street traffic. New garden beds, boulders and logs have been carefully placed to provide a protective vegetated buffer around the playground.


Share your feedback below by Sunday 19 September 2021 or attend the Hilton precinct group meeting on 14 September (details here).

We're planning an upgrade of Griffiths Park to make sure it meets the needs of all users. It will include a play space renewal, conversion of the sump to an open swale integrated into the park and irrigation / hydrozoning.

The project is grant funded which means it needs to be delivered within a set timeframe. We aimed to get as much community input as possible early in the process so it can incorporated it into a concept design.


What we heard

Through other recent engagements we've gathered some input about what you value about Griffiths Park and how it could better suit your needs. In stage one engagement we heard from 50 participants online, 60 people attended the drop-in and we worked with 19 local students.

  • Broad support for converting the sump to an integrated swale with a focus on simple seating and a quiet space to connect with nature.
  • Key values are the trees, open space, birds, bird habitat, dog exercise, play equipment and the circular path. Biodiversity / habitat and swale could be a point of difference between this park and others in Hilton.
  • Climbing and nature play were ranked in the top three preferred activities across all methods. Swinging or being in a cubby were also popular.
  • The most frequently mentioned play element was a flying fox, followed by slides, swings, monkey bars and climbing frames, with the need to include more challenging / bigger pieces catering to older children while maintaining function for young children.
  • Separating users was raised several times with differing views on how and why. The key conflict identified was dogs and children, with some suggesting fencing around the playground or part of playground. Others do not want fencing or prefer use of landscaping or ideas such as separating the dog and human water fountains. Many children also noted they visit the park with their dog.

You can access the stage one engagement report here or from the document library.

You can explore each aspect of the upgrade in the interactive image above - click to view proposed options and information and click the icon on the bottom right hand corner to enlarge the image.

The Draft Concept Design including a full view of the park is also available to view as a PDF by clicking here or from the document library.


Key moves

In response to what we heard we’ve developed a draft concept. The key moves are:

  • Convert the sump to a multi-use swale with a natural approach to stormwater management. It will also contribute to biodiversity / habitat and usable community space by incorporating local plant species, adding walk trails, seating and wild play.
  • Retain and foster existing mature trees for shade, habitat and sense of place, and integrated into the design of the park as part of the upgrade. Where mature trees appear in poor health which can be treated, the City will take steps to remediate the trees. Some trees may need to be removed due to a range of issues including their decline from age or unrecoverable health issues.
  • The swale, play area and kickabout area have been expanded and we anticipate some younger trees which are poorly placed and are exhibiting health issues like being rootbound, may need to be removed. The City will ensure additional tree planting, in appropriate locations will be included in the proposed design.
  • Upgrade the irrigation and build on the ecological theme from engagement by removing turf from selected areas to conserve water and increase biodiversity.
  • In response to the preference for climbing and nature play, the concept design includes a climbing fort with slide, net and cubby, swings, and the popularly requested flying fox. Also, the playground and multi-use swale incorporates boulders and logs to create nature play opportunities and enhance the ecological themes.
  • We understand that the park needs to cater to various users. Various turf ‘rooms’ are for passive and active recreation activities from picnics to a kickabout area with footy practice goals.
  • Also highlighted was the separation of the playspace from informal dog exercise areas as well as surrounding street traffic. New garden beds, boulders and logs have been carefully placed to provide a protective vegetated buffer around the playground.


Share your feedback below by Sunday 19 September 2021 or attend the Hilton precinct group meeting on 14 September (details here).

Feedback Wall

Please review the draft concept design for Griffiths Park by exploring the interactive image or downloading the PDF version then share your feedback below by the 19 September 2021. Tell us your thoughts on the Swale, Playground and Key Moves proposed and whether they suit your needs. 

You will be asked to choose a screen name and provide an email address to post your feedback below. 

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Very exciting to see this tired space getting some attention and a face lift.

Like many other users i think it is very important to maintain ultimate usability for dog exercise as this is the only official off lead space nearby. Multi functional spaces are great but proximity of designated dog areas and play equipment should be considered.

Swale redesign is a great idea.

Please maintain as many trees as possible. At the very least replant more than may be removed. We all know that a good canopy is the number one way to keep our neighbourhoods cool on hot days.

I like the native garden areas but they should be able to withstand dogs running and chasing through them.

Another picnic table or two would be welcome and would be well suited to the corner spaces amongst the native bush where lots of some turf would not have a huge impact on dog exercise usability.

Rusty 28 days ago

As an off lead dog park, this design seems to limit dog play areas. As locals we utilise this park daily for dog exercise.

Converting the sump to a more useable space is a good idea.

I disagree with any plan to remove trees that are not dying or have unrecoverable health issues. There is no need to lose tree coverage for ‘turf rooms’ as the trees play a huge part in the amenity of the park as it is.

My kids are teenagers and our family uses the park for dog exercise, picnics and throwing a frisbee. The deign of the playground will negatively impact me if it coincides with a restricted dog area.

PipS 28 days ago

- [ ] Include Signage saying this is a gazetted off lead dog area. Many residents don’t seem to know this.

- [ ] Confirm there is dog water fountain.
- [ ] Consider Bins: recycle, dog compost bin, general waste.
- [ ] Hedge or plants on the edge of the park to deter dogs and kids from crossing the street while playing.
- [ ] Dual language (English and aboriginal language signs noting location, flora and fauna and seasons.
- [ ] Has Lighting and light pollution been considered for fauna?

Deana 28 days ago

Please keep the grassed area at the southern end of the park and compress the proposed native area, so that existing grass is allowed to remain extending southward close to large tree 57 . This will have three major benefits:

1. The perfect grassed picnic area between large trees 54 and 63 will be maintained. This is currently a beautiful spot, shaded in summer, and has the best grass in the park. Why tear up a nice grassy picnic spot? Your current plan proposes that most of the shady grassed areas in the park be covered in woodchips and natives. Where will we have picnics if you destroy all of these nice shaded grassy spaces?

2. The open grassy alleyway extending north/south from tree 65 to tree 57 will be maintained. This is a long, open space already perfect for throwing/kicking a ball or playing frisbee (with humans or dogs). Your current plan proposes a small new "kick-about" area right in the middle of trees that you are evidently planning to remove (74, 75, and 76). Why kill trees to create a small, inferior "kick-about" area, when a superb long ball play area already exists at the southern end of the park between trees 57 and 65?

3. The large open dog playspace at the south end of the park, extending north/south from tree 65 to 57 (and the width of the park at this end) will be maintained. Many people with dogs already use this space to throw ball or play with their dogs - and yes, living across from the park my observation is that people with dogs are the most frequent and consistent users of this park. Not only is this a large open area (don't look at the plan, come see it in person), but it is as far away from the playground as you can get. Why cover this area in woodchips and natives, thus forcing dogs to exercise closer to the playground?

There are many good features to the large grassed area at the southern end of the park, extending south to tree 57. If you want to deliver on "health and happiness", you shouldn't destroy this well-used area by covering it with woodchips and natives. Natives already predominate on verges in this area, and no amount of grassed verges could recreate the open grassed area you are proposing to destroy.

RP 28 days ago

Thanks for upgrading this park. I look forward to this being used more by families. Contrary to some comments, this is not primarily a dog park, but also a people park. This will be very well patroned by families once these upgrades are complete. As house blocks become smaller, these large spaces with wild play become so important to children. I look forward to the playground areas being zoned as dog free so mine and other young children can play safely at ground level without fear of dog intrusions. If dog owners want larger running spaces for their dogs, Hilton Park and Hilton PS oval offers these options.
I look forward to the swale with various strata of vegetation that replicates local habitat for flora and fauna and contains only local species and has a wild feel about it for kids to explore. We need bush land in Hilton.
I hope you can retain that lovely log currently near the playground. Yes, we also need some challenging climbing places for older kids.
I can see that the current path is being retained, as this is in good condition, I’m glad it will not be wasted and no more concrete added to the park, Grigg Park offers basketball as does the PCYC courts.

Veronica 28 days ago

What a great opportunity for Griffiths Park and Hilton! Well done on the draft concept and thank you for the opportunity to comment.

I agree with a number of comments, in that we don't need to "squish" lots of ammenities into every park, particularly since we have a number of parks within walking distance around Hilton. Therefore, I wonder if the designated "kick about" area is even required, or at least, could it be positioned further towards the Northern end of the park to allow for more open spaces for dogs to run further from where children will be playing - my kids often don't kick a ball at GP due to dogs wanting to "join in" ;). The possibility of another doggy fountain away from the playground may also assist in preventing unintended child vs dog encounters...

In the same vein, given that the two other Hilton parks (Grigg and Moorni Boorn) have playgrounds catering to the younger aged groups, could this be a good opportunity to provide a more challenging playground for older children/adolescents (as was the request from many of the students involved in the school workshops). The flying fox looks great and the kids are stoked about this addition, however the fort appears to be lacking some challenge.
The ol' school ladder/trapeze frame that looks like it will be removed (on the eastern side of the park) is often used by older children in ways that make their parent's gasp (which is what they are meant to do!!), I wonder if something similar, including monkey bars, higher height climbing frame could be added to the fort? Even though there are plenty of amazing trees in the space, most of them are not "climbable"... not for lack of trying!!

I am particularly excited about the transformation of the sump, I think the addition of more understory plants and incorporating areas for exploration and discovery in a landscape that already has slopes and interest will be a great addition to Hilton (and hopefully it can lead to more of the same e.g. Grigg, Collick st etc). Finally, incorporating signage/carvings in the logs linking to local flora & fauna species and local Noongar history of the area (as per Moorni Boorn) could help build a connection to nature and culture.

Cath Fitz about 1 month ago

The designated are for dogs is way too small - especially for a park that is gazetted for an off lead area.

Maybe some signage around the park stating this is an off lead area would be useful to help manage expectations around intended (and unintended) dog/child interactions?

I’ll echo the previous comments on the kick about area - it’s not needed here, the ground slopes, and I’d like to retain as many trees as possible. the school oval is much better suited for this purpose or across Carrington.

It would be nice to retain the corners as an area to walk through please consider having path ways that allow this - with consideration for prams and people with limited mobility.

The south corner (near doolya / Holmes / Nicholas cres) could use a connecting path - again suitable for prams and limited mobility users.

If there is any way to move the play equipment from the centre of the park this might also be a good consideration to make the most open space for multiple uses.

Park user about 1 month ago

Using the park on a twice daily basis, we see the very large number of dogs at any given time enjoying their off leash time at this park. I'm concerned that such a significant reduction in the amount of turf that is proposed to be mulched and planted up, in particular on the perimeter of the park, is further going to congest the run about areas for both dogs and kids and create substantial angst for both user groups.

I understand the waterwise aspects of hydro zoning, but looking around other examples of mulched, native planted up areas in Hilton, they soon become unsightly (for example the garden beds on South St at Hilton Town Centre, verges) if not regularly maintained. In reality, is this treatment going to substantially increase the maintenance required of these areas? At the moment, there isn’t a multitude of spaces with different maintenance needs and the turf can be easily mowed and maintained. Will the City of Fremantle implement regular winter weeding and /or herbicide applications in these spaces?

Adding footy goals further adds to the congestion and conflict of the middle of the park area. I really hope this is rethought, considering the Hilton Primary School Oval and Dick Lawrence Oval (within walking distance) both have these facilities. I would much prefer to keep the well-used open space aspect of the area as much as possible.

The best bit about the concept is the transformation of the sump. This will totally lift the park and hopefully be rolled out to other locations in the district.

traceyk about 1 month ago

I would love to see a properly fenced, double gated, dedicated off-lead dog exercise area be incorporated into the Park. Fremantle Council has no facilities of this kind at all (Cockburn has 5 with 2 more planned) Many dog breeds can't be let off leads in unfenced areas (sight hounds) and its about time Freo had a facility of this kind.

Jo-Ann about 1 month ago

Football goals are a waste due to the slope and already limitted space. Keep the area open for turf room and dog play. BBQ facilities and seating would be ideal in-between kids play areas

Benson about 1 month ago

I'd be interested to know if there's been any surveys done to quantify usage of the park, but I'd suspect it's primarily used as a dog exercise area? In which case I'm concerned that the designated dog area is quite small, and that the turfed areas in the corners are to be removed. There are heaps of dogs in Hilton living in small backyards that need exercise, and having lots of dogs concentrated in a small area of the park is a recipe for conflict. The turfed areas at the corners of the park currently provide the space for dogs to spread out, chase a ball etc.
I also wonder if we're trying to jam too much in - like the 'kickabout' area etc? Upgrading the play equipment is great and replacing the sump with the swale will be awesome, but otherwise I'd leave it pretty much as it is.

TW about 1 month ago

BBQ facilities would be fantastic for this park in various areas as such a large space.

Blair about 1 month ago

Can we please have a paved/concrete path around to ride bikes and scooters

Elena Skurikhina about 1 month ago

small skatepark added, for the kids and the older kids!
I know many hiltoners that would get behind this proposal

Olliewhitham about 1 month ago

Love the concept and inclusion of more natural areas. I agree with comments below about having a BBQ or basketball court (maybe we can get these in the future?).
I had hoped that the flying fox would be a bit bigger/longer/epic/suitable for adult and make use of the natural slope, but maybe I was being a little more adventurous in my imagination than Council can install!

Raffienda about 1 month ago

Thanks for the community consultation. A few comments:
- would there be shading on the playground or surrounding seats? It gets so hot on that playground now in summer, without established trees shading the area it makes it hard to use in summer
- the proximity to the roads is concerning as a parent of young kids, or those kicking a ball. I often drive down those roads and am always checking for dogs or kids going into the road
- I love the inclusion of the flying fox for older kids, there isn’t much for older kids in Hilton.

Password about 1 month ago

Barbecue facility and a basketball court would be ideal. Hilton definitely lacks this

Bonnie Panizza about 1 month ago

Hi, I would love it if there was some protection for the dogs at either side where it adjoins the streets. Some dogs sometimes get a bit distracted and those two roads get some traffic late afternoons. Some medium size but dense hedges would work really well here. Atriplex cinera and Scaevola crassifolia combination would be good and tie it in with the other gardens around it. There was an accident not too long ago in Hilton with another dog, and would hate this to happen to a dog here. Great work though, and thanks for doing some community consultation.

Frank B about 1 month ago

Hello, design looks great. As said elsewhere a few essential and simple aspects that could be added.
-Monkey bars
-BBQ facilities
-Make use of the natural shading from existing trees at rest/meetings areas,

-No fencing, please leave it as natural and open as possible (I have 2 under 4years old and have no concerns with the roads as the play areas are designed to be central)

Looking forward to seeing (and using) the result!

Rgds
Graham

Graham about 1 month ago

I don’t think dogs have properly been taken into consideration. As a gazetted dog park there needs to be separation from play areas.

Matt R about 1 month ago